NAWCJ

Ten Minutes with Honorable Catrice Johnson-Reid



Honorable Catrice-Johnson Reid
District Judge in the New Orleans Workers’ Compensation Court
Louisiana Workforce Commission

 

L&V:   What is your formal title?

CJR:   I currently serve in the capacity as the District Judge for District 8. District 8 covers the Greater New Orleans area (Orleans Parish) for the Louisiana Workforce Commission – Office of Workers’ Compensation Administration.

L&V:   How long have you been at your current position?

CJR:   I started at the Agency in July, 2016, first as a Division Judge for District 8. I was then promoted to District Judge in January, 2018.

L&V:   Where is your office?

CJR:   The District 8 office is located in downtown New Orleans, next to the Caesars Superdome (home stadium of the New Orleans Saints), Smoothie King Arena (home stadium of the New Orleans Pelicans) and near some of the best restaurants in the city. I couldn’t wish for better surroundings.

L&V:   How many judges are in your office:

CJR:   District 8 is set up to accommodate two (2) judges. However, at the present time, I am the only judge in District 8.

L&V:   How many workers’ compensation judges are there in your state?

CJR:   The State of Louisiana is comprised of 10 districts around the State of Louisiana which has 15 judges and a Chief Judge.

L&V:   What is your caseload?

CJR:   Currently District 8 has 332 active matters.

L&V:   Are you required to apply the Rules of Evidence in your hearings and decisions?

CJR:   Yes, workers’ compensation courts in Louisiana operate as courts of original jurisdiction pursuant to the Louisiana Constitution, Article V, §16.A.(1) and we follow and are governed by the Louisiana Code of Evidence and Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure, except as otherwise provided for in Title 23 of the Louisiana Statutes or by the Hearing Rules under Title 40 of the Louisiana Administrative Code.

L&V:   Do you rule from the bench?

CJR:   Yes, I do rule from the bench but occasionally for complex hearings and most trials I take the matter under advisement.

L&V:   What did you do before you became a judge?

CJR:   Before becoming a judge, I was in private practice.

L&V:   What do you like the most about judging?

CJR:   I love being able to assist the parties in reaching a resolution.

L&V:   What do you do to relieve the stress of judging?

CJR:   To relieve the stress of judging, I love organizing.

L&V:   Are you active in the legal community?

CJR:   Yes, I participate in continuing legal education seminars.

L&V:   Are you active in your community?

CJR:   Yes, I participate in community events through my church, my son’s school, and my sorority.

L&V:   Tell us about your family?

CJR:   I have been married to my husband for 18 years. I am the mother of a fifteen-year old son and twenty-five-year-old stepson.

L&V:   What are your hobbies?

CJR:   I love anything and everything dealing with old movies and television. My dream job would be to host a television show on the AMC Channel.

L&V:   What do you see as the value of your association with NAWCJ?

CJR:   The NAWCJ is a great medium for adjudicators to hone their skills, tap into the wealth of knowledge, perspective, and experience of the seasoned NAWCJ membership.

L&V:   Do you have any words of wisdom you would like to share?

CJR:   While I am not as seasoned and experienced an adjudicator as my fellow brethren, my words of wisdom are to ALWAYS be open to learning.